[CentOS] Moving files to new server

Johnny Hughes mailing-lists at hughesjr.com
Sun Mar 5 16:14:38 UTC 2006


On Sun, 2006-03-05 at 11:01 -0500, Thomas E Dukes wrote:
>  
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: centos-bounces at centos.org 
> > [mailto:centos-bounces at centos.org] On Behalf Of Johnny Hughes
> > Sent: Sunday, March 05, 2006 10:51 AM
> > To: CentOS ML
> > Subject: RE: [CentOS] Moving files to new server
> > 
> > On Sun, 2006-03-05 at 10:20 -0500, Thomas E Dukes wrote:
> > >  
> > > > -----Original Message-----
> > > > From: centos-bounces at centos.org
> > > > [mailto:centos-bounces at centos.org] On Behalf Of Chris Mauritz
> > > > Sent: Sunday, March 05, 2006 10:08 AM
> > > > To: CentOS mailing list
> > > > Subject: Re: [CentOS] Moving files to new server
> > > > 
> > > > Thomas E Dukes wrote:
> > > > > Hello,
> > > > >
> > > > > I am getting a new computer and am going to need to 
> > move the files 
> > > > > from the old to the new.  What is the best way to do this?
> > > > >
> > > > > Should I install CentOS from scratch on the new computer
> > > > then move the
> > > > > directories I need?  How do I maintain permissions if this
> > > > is the best way?
> > > > >   
> > > > 
> > > > If you have the luxury of having both machines online at the same 
> > > > time, why not just use the easy way out and use rsync?
> > > > Or as someone else suggested, you could physically attach the new 
> > > > drive to the old computer and copy the data to to it with 
> > any number 
> > > > of tools (tar/dump/cp/etc....).
> > > > 
> > > > Cheers,
> > > 
> > > I can put both online but have never used rsync nor dump.  
> > The old pc 
> > > is old! A P3-450, 18GB HD.  The new one is a P4-3.0Ghz with 
> > 1GB ram.  
> > > The way CentOS will do the partitions will probably be 
> > different than 
> > > from the old, especially the SWAP.
> > 
> > You don't need to copy swap.
> > 
> > > The old system has been upgraded numerous times since 
> > RedHat 8.0.  I 
> > > like the idea of a fresh install but want to make sure I have 
> > > everything working on the new without missing something I 
> > installed on 
> > > the old one.
> > 
> > You can just use disk druid and create your partitions any 
> > way you want ...
> > 
> > I personally grab the old hard drive, stick it in the new PC 
> > and use rsync (or cp -a ) to copy each partition into the new one.
> > 
>  Hello Johnny,
> 
> I believe by default, CentOS will setup a /boot, / and SWAP partitions.  Is
> it still a good idea these days to create one for /home and /var?
> 

That depends on if you will need to add additional space later
specifically to those places.

We put lots of stuff in home in our server set ups ... and var has lots
things (like logs) that grow.  If you use LVM on your machine, you can
add new drives (Physical Volumes / PVs) and add space to other
partitions.  In this senerio, having things like /tmp and /var and /home
on separate partitions helps to more easily add things.

But if the hard drive you have is not going to need to be added to for
the lifetime of your install ... then having more than the 3 basic
partitions is adding complexity that is probably not required.

(With the exception of maybe home on a separate drive and partition ...
I do this with my main workstation.  So that I can do a new install on
another machine ... then move my home drive over.  This is helpful when
do upgrades to new OSes, etc.)

For a normal setup though, where the machine is not probably going to
switch to a new OS, I normally just do a swap and /boot and root
partition.
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