[CentOS] xorg.conf disappear

Bob Hoffman bob at bobhoffman.com
Thu Mar 29 11:04:01 EDT 2012


On 3/29/2012 10:06 AM, Cal Webster wrote:
> On Thu, 2012-03-29 at 09:57 +0100, Lars Hecking wrote:
>> brick writes:
>>> Hi
>>>
>>> My system is CentOS 6. I need to edit xorg.conf. But it can't be find in
>>> /etc/X11. Where is it? How can I get the default setting?
>>   /var/log/Xorg.0.log will tell you which configuration Xorg is currently
>>   using, which devices are autodetected etc. If you need to change only
>>   particular parts of the config, you can drop a .conf file with the
>>   corresponding Section into /etc/X11/xorg.conf.d.
>>
>>   E.g. if you needed a UK keyboard instead of the default US, you could use
>>   something along the lines of
>>
>> # cd /etc/X11/corg.conf.d
>> # cat keyboard.conf
>> Section "InputDevice"
>>          Identifier  "Keyboard0"
>>          Driver      "kbd"
>>          Option      "XkbModel" "pc105"
>>          Option      "XkbLayout" "gb"
>> EndSection
>> #
> If you know what you need, adding a separate conf file
> in /etc/X11/xorg.conf.d/ is the cleanest way to go. If you need some
> type of custom setup, however, you can generate an xorg.conf using "Xorg
> -configure". The X server must not be running when you do this.
>
> ## Go to run level 3
>
> init 3
>
> ## Generate xorg.conf
>
> Xorg -configure
>
> ## The configuration file will be stored in "root" user's home (/root)
>
> > From there you can modify it as needed then move it to /etc/X11/ and
> "init 5" to test. You can test your changes by jumping in and out of run
> level 5.
>
>
> > From Xorg(1) man page:
>
> -configure
>
>       When  this option is specified, the Xorg server loads all video
> driver modules, probes for available hardware, and  writes  out an
> initial xorg.conf(5) file based on what was detected.  This option
> currently has some problems on some  platforms,  but  in most  cases  it
> is  a  good way to bootstrap the configuration process.  This option is
> only available when the server is  run as root (i.e, with real-uid 0).
>
> ./Cal
>
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>
I thought it placed a conf file in the home directory of any user who 
brought up a x window/desktop?


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