[CentOS] xorg.conf disappear

Cal Webster cwebster at ec.rr.com
Thu Mar 29 10:06:33 EDT 2012


On Thu, 2012-03-29 at 09:57 +0100, Lars Hecking wrote:
> brick writes:
> > Hi
> > 
> > My system is CentOS 6. I need to edit xorg.conf. But it can't be find in
> > /etc/X11. Where is it? How can I get the default setting?
> 
>  /var/log/Xorg.0.log will tell you which configuration Xorg is currently
>  using, which devices are autodetected etc. If you need to change only
>  particular parts of the config, you can drop a .conf file with the
>  corresponding Section into /etc/X11/xorg.conf.d.
> 
>  E.g. if you needed a UK keyboard instead of the default US, you could use
>  something along the lines of
> 
> # cd /etc/X11/corg.conf.d
> # cat keyboard.conf
> Section "InputDevice"
>         Identifier  "Keyboard0"
>         Driver      "kbd"
>         Option      "XkbModel" "pc105"
>         Option      "XkbLayout" "gb"
> EndSection
> # 

If you know what you need, adding a separate conf file
in /etc/X11/xorg.conf.d/ is the cleanest way to go. If you need some
type of custom setup, however, you can generate an xorg.conf using "Xorg
-configure". The X server must not be running when you do this.

## Go to run level 3

init 3

## Generate xorg.conf

Xorg -configure

## The configuration file will be stored in "root" user's home (/root)

>From there you can modify it as needed then move it to /etc/X11/ and
"init 5" to test. You can test your changes by jumping in and out of run
level 5.


>From Xorg(1) man page:

-configure

     When  this option is specified, the Xorg server loads all video
driver modules, probes for available hardware, and  writes  out an
initial xorg.conf(5) file based on what was detected.  This option
currently has some problems on some  platforms,  but  in most  cases  it
is  a  good way to bootstrap the configuration process.  This option is
only available when the server is  run as root (i.e, with real-uid 0).

./Cal



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